AVERY DENNISON® LAUNCHES NEW SUPREME WRAPPING™ FILMS AT ISA SIGN EXPO

 

 

Mentor, Ohio, April 17, 2017 – Avery Dennison Graphics Solutions announced today the expansion of its Supreme Wrapping Film portfolio with the addition of eight colors in a satin finish and a gloss finish option for the existing ColorFlow series. Additionally, Lightning Ridge, a new iridescent color that shifts from green to purple, joins the ColorFlow™ Series. Avery Dennison will feature all of the new products in Las Vegas at the ISA Sign Expo in Booth 4380 on April 20-22.

Eight colors of Supreme Wrapping Film are now available with a satin finish option, introducing: Satin Orange, Satin Yellow, Satin Grass Green, Satin Light Blue, Satin Dark Blue, Satin Metallic Purple, Satin Silver and Satin Gray. These films are available in North America only.

Each film in the ColorFlow Series will see the addition of a gloss finish option. Now, installers can choose between satin and gloss finishes for Rising Sun (Red/Gold), Urban Jungle (Silver/Green), Roaring Thunder (Blue/Red), Fresh Spring (Gold/Silver), Rushing Riptide (Cyan/Purple) and the newest iridescent color, Lightning Ridge (Green/Purple).

“We’re excited to unveil new finish options in the Supreme Wrapping Film portfolio, with the same positioning, long term removability and bubble-free application features that have made these films so popular with installers,” said Jeff Losch, marketing director, Avery Dennison Graphics Solutions North America. “These new finishes are inspired by the needs and wants of our customers and their amazing work.”

“The new gloss version of the ColorFlow films and the addition of the Lightning Ridge color, takes the original satin finish to another dimension,” Justin Pate of The Wrap Institute said. “A vehicle wrapped in any of the ColorFlow films changes to four to five colors depending on the angle you look at the car; it’s like the client gets five wraps for the price of one.”

The notable qualities of the Supreme Wrapping Film portfolio, which boasts over 100 colors and finishes for car wraps, hold true across all finishes. Each film in the portfolio is easy and quick to install providing installation efficiencies for color change wraps.

For a closer look at the new products, visit Avery Dennison in Booth 4380 at the ISA Sign Expo in Las Vegas on April 20-22. Samples of Avery Dennison Supreme Wrapping Film are available from Avery Dennison representatives or vinyl distributors. Visit the Find a Distributor page on the Avery Dennison website to locate a distributor in your area. ColorFlow and new Satin films are available in 60” x 25 yard rolls, more information is available at graphics.averydennison.com/colorflow.

For details on Avery Dennison products, designers, printers and installers can visit graphics.averydennison.com or contact Avery Dennison at 800-282-8379 for additional information.

 

Wrap Training with Justin Pate at 25% OFF!

Web_AD_TheWrapInstituteWho doesn’t dream of doing a killer wrap training class with world renowned industry trainer Justin Pate?  Whether you wrap occasionally or are a seasoned veteran you know that there is always something new to learn.  …and now you can for less!

The Wrap Institute is an online streaming service that provides high quality videos on how to apply graphics featuring master installer Justin Pate.  Annual memberships give users unlimited access to over 530 videos that cover topics from boats, walls, windows, cars, vans, vinyl lettering and much more. Each month 20-30 new videos are added along with new features like free pdf downloads for pre-inspection and quality control.  All content is neutral which means all techniques shown apply to any type of film or manufacturer.   Never Stop Learning!

Sign-Up now and use our exclusive Coupon Code for your 25% discount – TWWRAPPERMAPPER – in the sign-up form.  Head over to The Wrap Institute now.

5 Tips for Awesome Wrap Photos

Vehicle wraps are, by their nature, awesome looking works of commercial art.  The combination of spectacular designs, cool finishes, slick effects and amazing cars make a perfect visual match.  So why do so many of us fall short when showcasing our wrap work?  WrapperMapper.com thought perhaps it would be nice to compile a nice Top 5 Tips list to help out.

 

Tip #1 – Shoot at the Right Time of Day  –Digital Photography School

RIGHT TIME OF DAY

RIGHT TIME OF DAY

Shooting at the right time of day.  This is by far the most common mistake people make when shooting cars. The best time to shoot will be a few minutes after sunset (or a few minutes before sunrise). Use a tripod and get that perfect soft light on the wrap! This photo was taken for TopGear a few minutes before sunrise.

 

 

 

 

 

Tip #2 – Creative Angles – Neil James with Infinity Digital Imaging

NeilJames_Porsche

CREATIVE ANGLES

Be creative with your angles.  To make your shots stand out, try shooting from different angles, such as just above ground level, and exploit vantage points that are available. Don’t forget that you can also move the car to take advantage of your shoot’s setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tip #3 – Use the Sun – Matt Bristow – Matt’s Portfolio

Matt_MBTip-2FINAL-655x436

USE THE SUN

One of the first things you’re taught in photography is never to shoot into the sun. Here’s a quick tip where you’ll get some awesome results by going against this.

All you need is one (yes one) flash. Pop it on top of your camera and set it to manual. If you set it to ETTL or the Nikon equivalent it won’t work as you’re not trying to create a balanced-looking shot and you’ll be up against the biggest light source in our solar system as your key light!

Set your camera to Manual and the ISO as low as it will go. Now set the shutter speed to anything that your flash can sync to. I’d suggest something around 1/160th as it wont make the slightest difference to the exposure. Set your aperture to around f16. This is one of the settings you will need to tweak and set your flash to something around 1/4 power (the other changeable setting).

Now take a shot – you need to be low enough and wide enough to get your subject and the sun in frame.

I shot the first photo at 1/80th at f16 and the end product is exactly as it came out of the camera; you can tell as there are a couple of horrible dust spots!

To finish off, I threw a curve and added a slight gradient to the sky and bang, all done in less than 10 minutes in post-production, and jobs a good’un! Yes I know you can achieve a similar effect in post but it will take you hours and will never (in my opinion) look as convincing.

 

Tip #4 – Panning for Motion Blur – Digital Photography School

MOTION BLUR

MOTION BLUR

Panning for Motion Blur.  A cool way to get some motion in your picture is to stand next to the road and let the car drive past you. Follow the car with your lens in one smooth action and set the shutter speed to 125th of a second. You will be amazed how easy this is! This Ferrari was shot at 125th of a second at 200mm. The car was driving roughly 60 km/h (40 miles/hr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tip #5 – Shooting at Night  – Digital Photography School

SHOOTING AT NIGHT

SHOOTING AT NIGHT

Shooting at night.  This might sound daunting but you will be amazed how easy and awesome this is! The biggest secret here is to find a spot where it’s completely dark, any streetlights or even a full moon could make life tricky.

When you have found this spot, set the camera up on a tripod. Set your ISO to 100, the shutter speed on 30 seconds and the aperture to f/9.
When the shutter opens take a strong constant light source and walk around the car ‘painting’ the car with your light. A normal household torch (flashlight) works for this.

There are no rules here, paint the car in different ways to get different effects; you will be blown away with the results!

Wrappers Delight or A Wrap Installer Kit

Wrap Installation Tools

Wrap Installation Tools

No, no, I did not misspell anything and yes, if you started “hip hoppin'” it was entirely intentional. While our industry’s wrappers aren’t quite the same as Sugarhill Gang we do get the same kind of satisfaction in creating something innovative and new. Wrapping is an art. A craft. A detailed and exacting application of skill and expertise. It is what we do and this photo is about the tools we use to do it.

The professional wrap installer’s kit can contain an amazing array of tools and items. One wrapper’s kit might be tight and streamlined while another wrapper might have every possible tool under the sun. We all have our methods and we all have our preferred setup so this is, by no means, a comprehensive list. With this in mind, please check out a typical professional wrap installer’basic kit.

1. ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape, Advanced Multi-Surface, 1.41-Inch by 60-Yard: 1.5″ rolls of this tape are perfect for holding graphics during a dry-fit while also removing cleanly.
2. Rolle-Pro: An excellent roller tool designed for fast channel / rivet work. The Rolle-Pro also doubles as a surface roller.
3. Stanley 33-525 25-Foot-by-1-Inch PowerLock Tape Rule with Blade Armor: An absolute must for any wrap installer.
4. Lisle 81200 Plastic Chisel Scraper Set: This is a plastic based, handled chisel for removing vehicle emblems without damaging paint.
5. 3M L Roller: a specialty tool from 3M to help lay graphics properly into various grooves and channels.
6. WrapCut Pro tape: this a specialty mono-filament tape designed to precisely place film cuts without risking a knife blade damaging the paint.
7. Scissors: Self explanatory but primary used to do rough cuts of film & liner prior to installation.
8. Lil’ Chizler: A plastic chisel tool designed to help remove graphics without paint damage.
9. Stabilo / Staedtler Pencils: Water based marking pencils used for all sorts of placement applications. Easily cleaned without staining the surface though the red ones can stain quickly if not removed promptly.
10. Sealit! Pen: A clear edge sealer in an easy pen applicator. The Sealit! pen helps secure potentially problematic edges and provides more protection for seam edges.
11. 70% Isopropyl Alcohol: This all-around cleaning solvent is very common for the final surface cleaning prior to installation. Can be purchased at any WalMart, CVS, WalGreens, Kroger location.
12. BAFX Products (TM) – Non Contact – Infrared (IR) Thermometer (-58F – +1,022F) – W/ Pointer Sight – BATTERY INCLUDED!: A hand-held laser thermometer used to confirm that the film has been properly heated for final post-heating.
13. 6 PACK OLFA 9mm Stainless Steel Auto-Lock Professional Graphics Knife SVR-2: a handy flat blade with snap off points for fast trimming
14. Elmers/X-Acto X3036 Axent Knife with Cap, Red: a sharp angled razor blade for small detailed trimming, radius and smooth curves.
15. Wrap Glove: a lint free glove enabling a wrapper to work with film without contaminating the adhesive.
16. Squeegees: Various scratch resistant squeegees in various sizes for various applications
17. Bernzomatic TS8000 – High Intensity Trigger Start Torch: Hand-held heat source for fast & controlled graphics heat. A firm grasp of the techniques and application of a torch are vitally critical.

 

All of this, of course, is just one opinion for a basic wrap installers kit.  There are myriad of other tools available.  Professional wrap installers all over the world will have all sorts of tricks and techniques requiring additional specialty tools.  At the end of the day; however, it is not the tools that make a wrapper but the skill, determination and attention to detail that sets a novice apart from a pro.  The perfect tool in the hands of an amateur will be trumped every time by the simplest tool in the hands of a trained professional.

 

Good wrapping!

Chase Graphics wraps trailer for Lawn Sense

ChaseGraphics_LawnSenseProject_Blog06-2014

The folks out at Chase Graphics were pleased to be given the opportunity to help out a local landscaping company.  Sending out crews in a nice sized trailer seems like a such a waste if said trailer is not fully proclaiming the brand.

According to owner Charles Chase, Lawn Sense uses the trailer to promote and service their cutting & fertilization program.  Charles and his staff were able to develop a nice full wrap concept for Lawn Sense and put their plan into action.  Using their previous work on the Lawn Sense truck fleet they were able to bring in the existing branding and keep the trailer in line with the corporate identity.

The wrap was designed in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator and was produced on 3M ControlTac cv3 film with 3M 8519 Luster Laminate.

Nice work Chase Graphics.

Wrap Project Feature – 12-Point SignWorks – Franklin, TN USA

12-Point SignWorks - Robertson Family Water wrap project

12-Point SignWorks – Robertson Family Water wrap project

When Robertson Family Water asked 12-Point SignWorks to design a new wrap and yard signs for them they dove right in (pun intended).  The request was for something a little different and fun while still looking corporate and professional.  12-Point SignWorks wanted to stay true to the Robertson Family brand but also make it look crisper, cleaner, and more vibrant.

The 12-Point SignWorks designers wanted to create a high-definition look for the vehicle so they split the design work between several different design programs.  Most of the images, like the water, bubbles and filters, were designed in Photoshop while the text and logos were done in Illustrator.  This helped keep the art looking crisp with “crazy bright colors.”  Another element that made a big difference in creating the HD look was using an actual photograph for the water.  The high resolution photo of water was edited and tweaked to create the best look rather than creating a digital print of water.

Overall, the whole thing has a sort of ’60s beach look, especially because the fonts are a modern take on a retro feel.  Maybe we’ll call this the Elvis-in-Hawaii-look?…Beach Blanket Boardroom?…We’ll think of something.  

According to the folks at 12-Point SignWorks, this project didn’t take very long at all.  It took a day and a half to manufacture the graphics using Avery 1005 EZRS with Avery 1060 DOL Gloss laminate.  An additional day and a half was needed to prep the vehicle and install the vehicle wrap itself.  All in all, the whole project only took one week from design to completion!

Nice work from 12-Point SignWorks in Franklin, TN USA!  To see more examples of their car and fleet work click here.

5 Things Wrap Installers Wish Printers Understood

Guy_palm

 

Professional Wrap Installers usually realize that they operate in a very specialized niche world.  Within the larger category of signs / graphics, a professional wrapper possesses a highly developed skill set that only applies to a certain subset of the industry.  So, in all fairness, we need to understand that a lot of clients simply do not understand the particulars that can make-or-break an install project.

This is my opinion of the top 5 Things Wrap Installers Wish Printers Understood.  Again, this is just my opinion folks.  I can guarantee that there are plenty out there who will disagree with the list.  They will want to add 5 more items or will have issue with the order of the list.  It’s all good and this is just meant to be helpful as we all continue our wrap journey.

1. Practical Knowledge:  Little to no understanding of what is involved in completing a wrap install correctly creates a frustrating level of expectation.  I could go on, in depth, about this one but I have recently written about this in length.  See the post about Using Professional Wrap Installers.  In a nutshell, truly professional wrap installers are not fly-by-night outfits.  We spend a lot of time, energy and money developing our skills and services.  The preconception that an installer just rolls up, throws a wrap on, and drives away in 4 hours perpetuates an unrealistic and harmful perception.  Take the time to talk with your wrap pro and listen to their thoughts, concerns and advice.  The final goal should be to work together and build a true understanding of what is involved.  By doing this, we all make sure the details are addressed and the end user gets an awesome wrap.

2. Rushed Printing:  Rushing prints through production creates serious problems for the installer folks.  The printing company might be under a time constraint but pushing out uncured solvent prints WILL create long term problems for you as well.  Prints that are still solvent soaked before being laminated are a big no-no.  The laws of physics insists that the solvent has to go somewhere and it will find the easiest path.  This means that the solvent will head back into the adhesive and will create an aggressive glue that is starting to break down before the install has even begun.  When an installer opens your box and the fumes about peel the skin off their face… you have a problem.  Not only will the wrap be harder to install but the graphic itself will have a much higher possibility of failing.  Plan ahead and give your prints 24-48 hours to out-gas before laminating.

3. Wiggle Room:  Not making the prints with enough extra print (bleed) for placement adjustments really handcuffs the wrap installer.  Vehicles are three dimensional and rarely line up like a piece of paper or your computer screen.  When the installer is trying to place the wrap so it ultimately looks correct, it helps to have some room for adjustment.  I have seen prints show up with literally 1/4″ of extra film to barely cover the surface but, even worse, it doesn’t give enough room to even hold the film.  I don’t know about you but my fingertips alone are bigger than 1/4″.  The standard bleed amount is 3″ around the perimeter of the print.  This give us a total of 6″ (horizontally and vertically) to shift, cover and basically figure out the best way to make your wrap design work.   Please note, this does NOT mean to stretch your print 6″ larger (this will mess up your scale & placement) but you should allow for an EXTRA amount of color/image that extends past the standard design size.

4. Quoting and Scheduling:  I’m going to be a little blunt here… asking for a quote without providing basic information is a pointless and unprofessional request.  The very least amount of information that you should provide when asking for an estimate is the Year, Make, Model of the vehicle(s), the wrap film and specific laminate you will provide, if you use liquid laminate with mask then say so, how many vehicles are there, window perf or not.  Also, if at all possible, supply a layout (this is a visual industry after all).  When you get these details to your potential wrap installer, her or she can actually work on supplying you with practical pricing & scheduling based on real-world information.  Calling up and just asking for a generic “quote to wrap a box truck” and if they can do it two days from now… well you get the picture.

5. Budget Pricing:  Dictating what your wrap installer’s price will be, when you have little understanding of #1 in our list, is a recipe for disaster.  Seriously… do you tell Apple how much they will charge for an iPad or your local plumber how much he’s going to bill to snake your drains?  Each market has it’s own unique costs and each company has it’s own overhead, cost of doing business and profit margin target.  Yes, we understand that the printer needs to make money & we understand that you have a budget to hit; however, basing your national install budget on what your local wrap employees get paid simply doesn’t work.  Take the time to get a realistic view of how the install process works as a whole and develop relationships with your wrap install partners.  Everyone will be much happier in the end.

So, my advice is to take the time to learn about what your wrap installers are doing and it will pay dividends for years.  You can talk more knowledgeably with your own clients and with your install partners as well.  As we all learn, we all improve and we all help the wrap industry grow and prosper.

Stay tuned for Part 2…

5 Things Printers Wish Wrap Installers Knew… (you didn’t think I would let the wrappers off the hook did you?)

Good Wrap Design is Important

Graphics4Cars_Scribble

If you are national wrap installer then it is likely you are listed on WrapperMapper and you install vinyl graphics on some nice new rides. The typical wrap installer is patient, detail oriented and can be trusted to hold a butane torch near a new R8.  Of course, Zen-like installation skills only go as far as the creativity of your wrap design.  So, how do you get good art for your customers?

Most wrap jobs are for commercial purposes.  You spot up the logo, the URL and a picture of the product.  Sounds easy right…?  Yeah, not so much.  A car is not a billboard or a piece of paper.  It has 2 sides, front back, a hood and a top.  So, from an art perspective you are designing a 3D project using 2D assets.  This 3D vehicle will be viewed from 8 angles at varying speeds.  The experience of seeing the car is the whole deal so whether the message is to “Eat at Joe’s”, “Drink this Water” or “We kill bugs” we have to help them catch eyeballs and create an impression.

Most people reading this are installers, not necessarily graphic designers.  If you aspire to be to be a master artist, you need to have a portfolio that is so strong you have no problem showing it to anybody at any time.  That means having at least 5000 hours (minimum) drawing time under your belt and a website that reflects your experience.  Next, learn Illustrator and PhotoShop so you can translate your ideas into print ready art.  Now the hardest part, you need to pick your customer’s brain to understand how to deliver their message effectively on the vehicle that is provided.

Here’s how I go about designing for a car.  A list and an example are a great place to start. What’s important to you? Who’s car do you like? What are some examples of your current brand?  What colors do you like?  Once you have all the information, get a picture of the car.   Here’s the cool method that an artist can use to design a ride.   As a traditional artist I like to draw in loose strokes in charcoal on paper.  Free form representations that follow the lines and curves that today’s cars have built in.  Using the film we have today we can use designs to accentuate the subtleties in cars, then take it off when the lease is over.

Many of you have an iPad. What you don’t know is that for about $30 you can set your self up to import a picture of a car and draw over the top of it with your iPad in a layer.  As an example, go to Graphics4Cars.com.  You will see a design called “Scribble” designed for the Hyundai Elantra.  The short story behind the design is that I was in Las Vegas a few weeks ago for a conference.  At that time I knew that I needed to get a new car so I took some pictures of a White Elantra in a parking lot with my iPad.  I imported the picture making a scribble which I then e-mailed to myself.  Later, after realizing how interesting my quick sketch looked, I re-drew it in vector right over my sketch in Illustrator.  We are wrapping the car this week to complete the process.

Here’s what you need if you want to sketch a design using your iPad.

• Sketch Club – I know the price is high, but you need the “Sketch Club” app from the App Store. It costs $2.99. This is great software that allows you to import a photo from your iPad library, then draw in layers using a stylus.

• Stylus – This is a stylus that I really like for drawing, the Musemee Notier V2. Amazon $16.99.

• A QwickDraw Microfiber Cleaner – a QwickDraw hooks around your pinky and allows drawing without “screen bounce”. $12 (free shipping)

The idea is give certified MapperWrappers the precise tools they need to install an eye-catching visual accent package on a specific car.  My goal is to have a design that takes about an hour a side to put on. I am starting with the Elantra, next will be the Honda Civic and the Hyundai Veloster.

Graphics4Cars.com designs and prepares art for automotive wraps. If your internal Michael Angelo or Di Vinci isn’t kicking in you can hire someone to do it for you.   You can get design work and film sent to you in a tube from ProSign&Graphics or Extreme Autowerks at a reasonable price.

Written By:  Mike Browne at mike@bigredshoes.com – Please contact me if you have tablet art or design questions.